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2013 NFL Draft: Why Philadelphia Eagles Got Steal of the Draft in CB Jordan Poyer

The NFL draft is alot like the stock market. It goes up and down almost instantly. There are players who see their stock go up due to a good combine performance, or an agent who knows how to talk up his client. There are also players whose draft stock goes down due to a poor combine performance,or a run-in with the law. That appears to be why cornerback Jordan Poyer slid all the way to the 7th round, where the Philadelphia Eagles picked him up with the 218th overall pick. Earlier this Spring, he was considered to be an early second-day pick.

Poyer could be an impact player from Day 1.

Poyer, still a junior at Oregon State, was arrested on May 21, 2012, in Corvallis, Oregon, and charged with second-degree trespassing after an incident at a bar near the Oregon State campus. He entered a bar under the age of 21, and was asked to leave. He proceded to return to the bar, and fought with security, leading to his arrest.

“It wasn’t a fight, it was more just me being dumb,” Poyer said. “I wasn’t 21, going into a bar, kind of refused to leave, got kicked out of the bar, wasn’t allowed to come back. And I came back, and it was just a bad situation.

To top it off, he had a poor combine. Reports from NFL.com cite him as having “Average size and strength for an outside corner. Doesn’t display the skills to press. Doesn’t disengage from blocks consistently”; his comparison was to San Franscisco 49ers starting cornerback Tarell Brown.

More important than that, however, is how he played in college, where he concluded his career with an Associated Press first-team All-American selection as a senior. He became Oregon State’s the first consensus All-American selection since John Didion in 1967. The Astoria, Oregon native was a semi-finalist for the Bednarik Award and Jim Thorpe Award and concluded the 2012 season by playing in the Senior Bowl.

Poyer started 24 games and finished his career at OSU with 151 tackles including seven tackles-for-loss and three sacks. He added 13 interceptions, 23 pass break-ups, three forced fumbles and two fumble recoveries. Poyer was also a standout on special teams as a return man and on coverage units. He is undersized, weighing only 191 pounds, but is known to be a solid tackler.

It is also interesting to note that Poyer was drafted by the Miami Marlins in the 42nd round out of high school. So, he obviously has athletic ability. And with Chip Kelly declaring all starting positions to be open, Poyer will have a chance to be a starter. Realistically, though, he end up competing with Brandon Boykin for the Nickel postion.  Bradley Fletcher and Cary Williams appear to have the two starting jobs locked up on the outside.

Poyer also has abilities as a return man, which increases his value. Last year, the Eagles tried Boykin and Bryce Brown at that position but they failed miserably.

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Categories: Eagles, Editorial

Author:Dave Maco

Philadelphia sports fan since 1992. I always say ive seen it all, but my hometown teams never seize to amaze. Not always in a good way. Favorite player on the Eagles is Jason Peters. I feel at his best, Peters is one of the best lineman in team history. Favorite Philadelphia sports moment : The Flyers erasing an 0-3 deficit against the Bruins in the 2010 playoffs.

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2 Comments on “2013 NFL Draft: Why Philadelphia Eagles Got Steal of the Draft in CB Jordan Poyer”

  1. Dave Maco
    April 28, 2013 at 11:04 pm #

    Thanks man! Yeah, i believe that a player projected to be drafted high and slips, can be fixed (unless its an ACL injury ofcourse). This “seems” to be a case of this young guy catching some bad luck.

  2. April 28, 2013 at 11:02 pm #

    Nice piece on Poyer. The more I read about him, the more I like. Especially as 7th round value.

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